"Discover What You Need to Know About Your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Test Results!"

This Book by Adam S. Barron, M.D., a Board Certified Rheumatologist, Will Help You Understand Your Bone Mineral Density Test, Causes of Bone Loss, and Find Out How You Can Work With Your Doctor to Determine the Best Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Prevention and
Treatment for YOU!

"You need to know if your doctor is prescribing the correct treatment for
your bone density loss! Find out why there may be more than one reason for your bone density decline."

 

From Adam S. Barron, M.D.

Re: Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Treatment and Prevention

Dear Friend,

"
I'm so glad you found this site!"
 

Welcome to your source for cutting edge information on osteopenia and osteoporosis.

The information will be highly valuable to you, and will help you understand osteopenia and osteoporosis, their causes, and various treatments in a plain language you can easily discuss with your doctor.

"I know you have questions about Osteopenia and Osteoporosis and
my book is here to help you."

This information will help you make sure that your physician is properly managing your osteopenia or osteoporosis. With the information in the book - Osteopenia and Osteoporosis - Information from the Experts, you will discover the in depth information you need to empower you to ask the right questions to get proper management and treatment.

Please let me introduce myself,
I am Adam S. Barron, M.D. and I speak as an expert in osteopenia and osteoporosis. I am a board certified rheumatologist with vast experience in evaluating and treating hundreds of patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis.

I am here to help you with your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis questions and I have the answers you need most.

Rheumatologists are experts in bone diseases, including osteopenia and osteoporosis and I am also certified by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry, a society that acts as a central resource for a number of scientific disciplines with an interest in skeletal health.

"I am sure you have many questions, and my patients ask these questions the most..."

What is Osteopenia and Osteoporosis?

I will first start by explaining osteopenia and osteoporosis. Osteopenia is also referred to as low bone mass or low bone density, a condition in which a person experiences a decrease in his or her bone mass that is greater than the normal amount experienced by the average person.

What is the difference between Osteopenia and Osteoporosis?

Osteopenia is much more common than osteoporosis, a condition in which a person’s bone mass deteriorates to a greater degree than in osteoporosis. An in-depth explanation of where osteopenia ends and osteoporosis begins is covered in the diagnosis section in the book below.

You may be wondering when you need to have a bone density test and why it is important...

Why should I be concerned about my low bone mass and strength?

The ultimate concern with osteopenia and osteoporosis is that when you have decreased bone strength, you are at a higher risk of breaking or fracturing a bone.

These fractures occur particularly at the hip, spine, and wrist. In addition, you can experience serious medical problems resulting from fractures, such as pneumonia, blood clots, depression, lack of independence, and death.

What could be causes for my low bone mass and strength?

Another concern regarding low bone mass and strength is the potential underlying reason for the abnormal loss of bone. If the cause is not found and treated, you may lose more bone. Additionally, you may have an undiagnosed medical problem, which may cause other health problems in addition to decreased bone mass and strength.

"My Doctor Recommended a Bone Density Test.
Do I Really Need One?"

Get Your Own Copy of the Book You Need To Answer Your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Questions Right Now!

 

 

Only $9.95

 

 

 

 

 

Understand the potential causes of bone loss, and what to do if you're diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis.

Understand your T-scores and laboratory tests, and the various treatments available.

Easy to read, nonscientific style, and highlighted throughout with case studies describing actual patient conditions.


Here are more c
ommon questions I am often asked:

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)

  • How can I prevent dowager's hump, like my grandmother has? How can I prevent problems with osteopenia and osteoporosis from happening to me? (see page 1.)
     

  • How is the bone mineral density test (DEXA) done? When should I have one? What age should my doctor do a bone density test? (see pages 3, and more on pages 27 - 28.)
     

  • How often should I have my bone mineral density test? (covered in depth on page 4.)

  • What is the "T score" and what does it mean? (see T Score Test Results explanation on page 5.)
     

  • When my doctor goes over my test results, how do I know what the test results mean? Can my doctor misinterpret my DEXA scores? (more on page 6.)
     

  • If my bone density test is out of normal, then how bad is it? (see test results and comparisons on pages 7 - 9.)
     

  • I have heard taking vitamin and mineral supplements can help prevent Osteopenia and Osteoporosis and I wonder how much calcium and vitamin D should I be taking? (see supplement facts covered on page 17.)
     

  • Does taking calcium and vitamin D really help and what is the right kind to take? How often and how much is right for me? (suggested dosages on page 18.)
     

  • Does exercise help with minimizing the damage from osteopenia and osteoporosis? What type of exercises should I do and how often?
    (page 29)


"Am I going to have osteoporosis as bad as my mother or grandmother?"

Here are questions about Osteopenia and Osteoporosis medications I am often asked by my patients:

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)

  • What are the side effects of medications? (See page 21.)
     

  • Is my bone density getting better or worse? How do I know? (page 21.)
     

  • Why is my bone density not increasing and getting better, as I am exercising regularly and eating well? (Discussed comprehensibly in this book.)
     

  • Will taking osteopenia and osteoporosis medications, called bisphosphonates, actually be more harmful than good for my bones?  (more on page 22.)
     

  • I have heard some medications for osteoporosis can irritate the stomach. What are the true facts about this? (see page 23.)
     

  • I have read that jaw problems can result from certain medications used to treat low bone mass?  (page 24.)

  • What else can I do to help my bone mineral  density besides taking prescription medications? (on page 25.)
     

  • What kind of exercises should I do to help my bone strength?
     

  • Can coffee and cola really cause me to have lower bone density? (find out more on page 20.)
     

  • What can I do to make sure I have a proper diet with enough calcium and vitamin D to help reduce my chances of getting osteopenia and osteoporosis? (see page 21.)
     

Here are questions about medications for other conditions as they relate to Osteopenia and Osteoporosis:

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)

  • Can my other medications for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disease cause Osteopenia and Osteoporosis? (see more on pages 7 - 9.)
     

  • Does my medication for my heartburn, gastritis and stomach ulcers make Osteopenia and Osteoporosis worse? Why would they? (see page 8.)
     

  • Can my thyroid, blood thinners or estrogen replacement therapy make my chances of getting Osteopenia and Osteoporosis higher? (on page 8.)
     

  • Do my medications for cancer, or for over active immune systems make me more susceptible to Osteopenia and Osteoporosis? (page 9.)
     

  • Can my injectable birth control treatment make me more inclined to bone loss? Will my treatment to reduce my estrogen level make my risk higher? (more on page 9.)
     

  • Which diseases increase my risk of lower bone density and strength? (covered on page 10.)
     

"What side effects can I experience with my Osteopenia and
Osteoporosis medication?"

Do you have these fears?

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)


Am I going to break a hip, arm or leg if I fall, like my mother/grandmother? How can I reduce my risk of fracturing if I fall? ( see page 22.)
What are the different medications and treatments for Osteopenia and Osteoporosis? How do these medications differ? How are these medications administered and how often? What should I know before being prescribed them? (covered on pages 23 - 25.)
 If I have to take medication for low bone density, will I develop side effects? What percent of people have side effects, and can they be severe? (pages 25 and 29 - 30.)
Can I develop muscle pain and bone pains from some of these medications for osteopenia and osteoporosis? (pages 24 - 25 and 29 - 30.)
What about jaw problems and other more serious complications with some of these medications? What are the risks? (see pages 24 - 25.)


"What are the right types and amounts for supplements?"


What do you want to know about your medication and supplements?

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)

  • Am I on the right medications and are the side effects I have normal? (see page 25.)
     

  • My doctor prescribed medication as well as calcium and vitamin D supplementation. What types of calcium and vitamin D supplements are available? Is any certain type more suitable for me? (on page 14.)

  • How much calcium do I need? (more on page 15.)
     

  • How often should I have a bone density test (DEXA)? (covered on page 32.)

  • How long do I need to take my medications? (page 25.)
     

"Why is my bone density not responding to my medication?"
 

What are some of the biggest problems you as a patient face?

(See Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book:)

Why are my bone density test results not responding to my medication? Is there some other reason for this? (pages 33- 35.)
 Could there be an underlying cause for my osteopenia or osteoporosis? How should I be evaluated by my doctor for an underlying cause? What percent of people with osteopenia or osteoporosis have low bone mass? (on pages 33 - 36.)
Should I see a specialist in bone diseases about osteopenia and osteoporosis? (page 29.)
Why does my insurance not want to cover the therapy for my osteopenia or osteoporosis? Do I have to have a broken bone or broken hip before they will cover it? (see pages 30 - 32.)
Is my doctor reading my bone density tests results correctly? How would I know? (on page 34.)
My current bone density results have not improved compared to my last bone density results. Despite this, my doctor did not change my medication for my osteopenia. Is this right? (see page 35.)
Why is my bone density not better as I am exercising regularly and eating well? (on page 38.)
My husband has had back pain that is not going away with regular therapy. Should he go for a bone density test? Why or why not? (see page 26.)
Can osteoporosis occur in men? When should a man be tested, and at what age? (more on page 26.)
 If I suffer a spinal fracture, what tests and what diseases should my doctor check me for? (covered on page 27.)

 

 

      "I found your website and wanted to find out more about my T scores and the treatment that my doctor is suggesting. I was worried about the different types of medications I see advertised and wanted to know more.

      Your book answered my questions in great detail and now I can discuss my treatment options and know how these medications may affect me. Thanks for writing a book that women can really use."

Sincerely,                 

Ruth N, Miami Florida

 
 

      "I was worried about my mother as she is taking medicine for her osteopenia and I wanted to know more to be sure that her doctor is treating her right.

      Learning about the different tests and how the tests are done, and what I need to do to help my mother was really worth the price of the book."

Regards,                 

Sharon D, West Palm Beach Florida

 


Get Your Own Copy of the Book You Need To Answer Your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Questions Right Now!




Only $
9.95

 

 

 

 

 

Understand the potential causes of bone loss, and what to do if you're diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis.

Understand your T-scores and laboratory tests, and the various treatments available.

Easy to read, nonscientific style, and highlighted throughout with case studies describing actual patient conditions.


"Does your doctor know the right lab tests to determine the cause of your low bone mass, and if it may potentially be reversible?"



Sometimes an underlying cause of the osteopenia or osteoporosis is not evaluated when it should be evaluated. If the underlying cause is not found, then often the bone mineral density will continue to decrease and may not respond adequately to medications. Additionally if the underlying cause is not found, then you can develop other problems and complications from the underlying illness which otherwise may have been prevented.

 

"Did you know that serious medical problems can result from a hip fracture, such as pneumonia, blood clots, depression and even death?"

Why should you or anyone be concerned with low bone mass and strength?

The ultimate concern with osteopenia and osteoporosis is that when you have decreased bone strength, you are at a higher risk of breaking or fracturing a bone. These fractures occur particularly at the hip, spine, and wrist. In addition, you can experience serious medical problems resulting from fractures, such as pneumonia, blood clots, depression, lack of independence, and death.

It has been estimated that at least 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, including eight million women and two million men. From these statistics, you can see that osteopenia and osteoporosis are common yet serious problems in women and men. Furthermore, over 33 million additional Americans have low bone density of the hip. So your odds of developing osteopenia and osteoporosis are very high.

The National Institutes of Health reports that 1.5 million osteoporotic fractures occur yearly in the United States. This includes 300,000 hip fractures, 700,000 vertebral or spine fractures, 250,000 wrist fractures, and 300,000 other types of fractures. Moreover, in 2005 more than $17 billion was spent on patients with osteoporosis

Osteopenia and osteoporosis are silent diseases. This means that there is nothing that your physician will find when examining you, and there are no abnormal lab results to diagnose osteopenia and osteoporosis. Therefore, you need to make sure that your doctor measures your bone mineral density, and does this over time

 

"Did you know that if you have one fracture, like a hip, spine or wrist fracture, you are at a much higher risk of experiencing
another fracture?"

What is the difference between a low-impact and a traumatic fracture?

Fractures such as at the hip may be the first sign of osteoporosis if you have not had your bone density measured, or if your bone density was normal prior to the fracture. In fact, if you have had a low-impact fracture, then by definition you have osteoporosis.

A low-impact or non-traumatic fracture means that a person breaks a bone in a circumstance in which this is not normally expected. For example, a low-impact fracture can result from falling off a chair or slipping on the floor and breaking a hip.

Another example of a non-traumatic fracture is a fracture sustained in the spine while lifting weights. A person who has this kind of fracture has osteoporosis regardless of the results of his or her bone mineral density test. However, breaking a hip during a motor vehicle accident is considered a traumatic fracture, and such a fracture does not necessarily imply that you have osteoporosis.

"What are crosslinks and how to they determine
my bone strength?"

You may be wondering how someone could sustain a non-traumatic fracture and not have osteoporosis show up on the bone density test. Although bone density tests do a good job of predicting the risk of developing a fracture, they do not tell the whole story. Bone density tests do not measure bone quality, which is how well the structure of the bone gives it strength.

Our bones contain horizontal and vertical crosslinks. The number of crosslinks and their interlinking contribute to the strength of our bones. Additionally, if the lower back or lumbar spine has significant arthritis, this condition can falsely elevate bone mineral density in that area. However, in most cases, if a patient develops a non-traumatic fracture, he or she has low bone density.

"Did you know that if you have a spinal fracture you are over 8 times more likely to die compared to someone without a spinal fracture?"

People who experience fractures increase their risk of dying. As you would expect, having a hip fracture significantly increases your risk of dying. You can expect this because of the risks associated with hip replacement surgery, including operative complications, infections, heart attacks, and strokes. If you suffer a hip fracture, your risk of dying increases six times over someone without a hip fracture. Moreover, the risk of dying after a spine fracture is even greater than the risk of dying after a hip fracture. The risk of dying after a spine fracture increases over eight times compared with someone without a spine fracture.
 

 


      "I purchased your book since I was concerned about my bone density test results. I was not sure that I was receiving the proper treatment since my bone density was not getting better with medication.

      Now after reading your book I know more about my bone density test results and I am able to talk with my doctor about my concerns."

Thanks for answering my questions,                 

Diana L, Denver Colorado

 


Make a small investment today which may pay huge dividends for your future bone health.  Purchase my book today:        

Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Information from the Experts Book

Get Your Own Copy of the Book You Need To Answer Your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Questions Right Now!


Only $
9.95

 

 

 

 

 

Understand the potential causes of bone loss, and what to do if you're diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis.

Understand your T-scores and laboratory tests, and the various treatments available.

Easy to read, nonscientific style, and highlighted throughout with case studies describing actual patient conditions.

 


I’m so sure that this guide will help you save time, effort and worry, and get better answers to your osteopenia and osteoporosis health care questions.

Get your questions answered right now.

Yours for good health,


It’s easy to get started right away. Just click the blue button below to order and you can have immediate access to this incredible osteopenia and osteoporosis health resource.

You will be amazed by the information offered in this book. Get your most pressing osteopenia and osteoporosis questions answered. You can use this information over and over again, to make sure your bone health and that of your loved ones is the very best it can be!

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You will be amazed by the information I’m going to offer in this guide. Get ready to have your osteopenia and osteoporosis health care questions answered now. Best of all, you can use this information over and over again, to make sure your health and that of your loved ones is the very best it can be!

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"When I found your website I was skeptical, but when I noticed that you had many questions listed that I had asked my doctor about but did not feel good about what I heard, I felt I needed more information from an expert.

      I was pleasantly surprised that you were able to clearly answer my questions in your book. I have recommended this book to my friends too."
 

Yours Truly,                 

Maria L, Albany New York

 
 

      
"I am very pleased that I read your book because it helped my husband. My husband had suffered a fracture in his spine. After reading your book I asked his doctor to run more tests.  He was found to have low testosterone.  He is now being treated and he is feeling much better overall.”

Thank you,                 

Caroline T, Palm Beach Gardens Florida

 

 

Get Your Own Copy of the Book You Need To Answer Your Osteopenia and Osteoporosis Questions Right Now!

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